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Sam Houston State University

Sam Houston State University



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Sam Houston State University is located in Huntsville, about 70 miles from downtown Houston, Texas.Founded in 1879, the university has a total enrollment of 15,300 and offers 84 undergraduate programs, 47 master's programs and four doctoral programs in selected disciplines. The university has been christened after Texas greatest hero, General Sam Houston.Sam Houston State – then Sam Houston Normal Institute - was created by legislation signed by Governor Oran M. Roberts with the purpose of training teachers for the public schools of Texas.The first class included 110 students and four instructors, and the site was the campus of Austin College. The graduates were conferred a certification to teach in the state's elementary and secondary schools.The university started awarding bachalerate degrees after 1919. It was rechristened Sam Houston State Teachers College, in 1923, became Sam Houston State College in 1965, and finally to the present name, in 1969.SHSU has been ranked as a “doctoral intensive” university by the Carnegie Foundation. SHSU also offers bachelor's and master's degrees through web-based distance education.In terms of academic resources, a well-equipped library caters to students and research scholors.Beyond academics, the university curriculum also provides for student’s recreation and other activities. On campus, there is a student-operated cable television station, radio station, and a campus newspaper – The Houstonian.Students accommodations have been provided in the form of 35 residence halls. Also featured on campus are a hotel, health center, and planetarium and observatory.


Department of History

The Department of History prepares students to learn about and analyze historical events evaluate change over time assess complex forces at work in the past and learn how, in written and oral expression, to explain these various phenomena. In doing so, the department prepares students for any career requiring critical and analytical skills. The Department of History is a vehicle—through teaching, research and service—for exploring the past on its own terms and understanding the present.

HIST 5097. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Students examine topics not specifically provided in any of the formal courses. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Consent of History Department Chair.

HIST 5098. Special Topic. 1-3 Hours.

Students examine topics not addressed in the current curriculum. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Department Approval.

HIST 5301. Methods in History. 3 Hours.

Students hone their research and writing skills needed for the M.A. in History degree. Students assess the various methodological approaches used by professional historians and learn how to conduct original research, engage in historiographical conversations, and communicate their research findings to a larger public. A. in History or departmental approval.
Prerequisite: Admission to the M.

HIST 5307. Intellectual History. 3 Hours.

Students examine major themes in intellectual history. Topics include the dynamics and statics of global philosophical traditions as realized in specific locales since the classical periods. Students discuss key texts in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5320. Mesoamerican Civilizations. 3 Hours.

Students examine the origins, growth, and organizational and cultural features of the great New World civilizations of the region, including human inhabitation, nascent agriculture, and the emergence of early complex societies. Students examine native civilizations such as the Aztec, Maya, and Zapotec and assess the role of evidence and theory in conceptualizing the past.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5333. Pre-Modern World History. 3 Hours.

Students examine major historical developments in the world prior to the sixteenth century. Topics may include war in the ancient world, comparative world religions, and Islamic civilization. Readings include important primary sources as well as secondary works.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5336. Pre-Modern European History. 3 Hours.

Students examine major historical developments in Europe prior to the sixteenth century. Topics may include Early Medieval Europe 300-1000 the Roman Empire and Europe in the Era of Crusades, 1000-1500. Readings include important primary sources as well as secondary works.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5338. Empires in World History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the role of empires in early modern world history, and focus on the experience and interactions of empires from 1400 to 1800. Topics include the events, strategies, and policies that determined the ability of the empires of the early modern period to respond to challenges, such as political or geographic. Military as well as social and economic developments will receive attention in discussions of success and failure of the empires.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5340. Recent African-American Hist. 3 Hours.

Students examine the African-American experience in United States history since the end of the Civil War. Topics include Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, national political leadership and intellectual thought, the Great Migrations, World War I, the "New Negro" and Harlem Renaissance, the labor movement, the Great Depression and World War II, and the modern Civil Rights Movement.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5342. The Japanese Colonial Empire. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of Japanese imperialism and colonialism in Asia from the late nineteenth century until the end of World War II. Topics may include settler colonialism in Korea, Taiwan, and Manchuria, Japan's militarization, fascist ideology, the Pacific Theater of World War II, and war trials.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5351. Early Medieval Europe. 3 Hours.

Students examine Europe during the so-called "Dark Ages" (300-1000), a period of dynamic transformation as the Roman Empire ended, Christian, classical and warrior cultures interfaced, and the search for order met great challenges.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5352. High and Late Medieval Europe. 3 Hours.

Students examine Europe across a period (1000-1500) characterized initially by growth and prosperity, diverse religious movements, towering urban constructions, the Crusades, and later by plague and peasant uprisings, which generated social unrest.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5353. Legacies of the Reformations. 3 Hours.

Students examine the sixteenth-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations and their effects on religion, society, politics, culture, and the economy. Particular attention will be given to the competing interpretations of their long-term historical significance.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5355. Holocaust & Genocide. 3 Hours.

Students examine various aspects of the Holocaust of European Jews by Nazi Germany and its allies during the Second World War (1939-1945). With particular attention to the years 1941-1943, students focus on different aspects of that genocide and may compare it with other episodes of mass killing in modern history. Numerous primary sources and victim and perpetrator perspectives will be incorporated.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5359. The Audible Past. 3 Hours.

Students examine the meaning and significance of sound, music, and noise in culture and analyze how sound technologies shape, and are shaped by, the values of the cultures that produced them. Students apply the tools of historical analysis to primary sources in the form of recorded sound.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5360. African Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the local and external forces that have influenced African environmental history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Students discuss methodological approaches, key themes, and debates in the historiography. Topics may include disease, conservationist ideologies (African and Western), demography, climate change, and the relationship between capitalistic economies (colonial and post-colonial) and environmental change in Africa.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5362. Smnr in Amercn Envirnmntl Hist. 3 Hours.

Students examine the complex relationship between nature and society in U.S. history. Topics may include economics land-use patterns and natural ecosystems and dramatic changes in natural and human communities that have engendered strong social and political responses.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5363. Seminar In Military History. 3 Hours.

Students examine selected topics in the history of war and violence. Topics may include war and the environment the experience of combat for soldiers civilians and societies at war transitions to peace and war in memory.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5364. Seminar in War & Violence. 3 Hours.

Students examine how societies experience military conflict and remember war. Students compare the national memories of war with historical realities, interpret how societal images of war change over time, and appraise how these factors influence society itself.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5365. Film and War in America. 3 Hours.

Students examine how film has altered the perception of warfare in the United States over the last century. Upon completion, students are able to compare the various views of war presented. Students examine the filmography to demonstrate how perceptions changed over time due to the influence of politics, patriotism, and warfare itself. Credit 3
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5366. The Reconstruction Era. 3 Hours.

Students examine the social, cultural, political, and military histories of Reconstruction after the U.S. Civil War. Topics may include the experience of military occupation, African American political activism, violence and terrorism, the retreat from Reconstruction, and sectional reconciliation.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5367. World War II. 3 Hours.

Students examine various aspects of the Second World War (1939-1945). Topics may include the military history of combat zones, the cultural and social history of the war, politics and strategy, technological developments, and economic change. Students evaluate various scholarly interpretations around the topic.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5370. Colonial America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the issues, peoples, and perspectives that shaped Colonial America. Topics may include exploration, settlement, and maturation of the North American colonies.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5371. Revolutionary America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the era of the American Revolution by surveying recent historical interpretations of the period. Topics may include the cause, conduct, and consequences of the American Revolution and the conflict in comparative perspective.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5372. Early National America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the development of the United States from 1783 to 1840 the failure of the Confederation organization of government under the Constitution the Federalist Period Jeffersonian democracy the War of 1812 national growth in the post-war period political and economic change the party structure the rise of Jackson and social reform.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5373. US Civil War. 3 Hours.

Students examine selected topics in the political, military, economic, and social institutions of the United States during the Civil War era. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5374. Seminar in the His of Am South. 3 Hours.

Students examines the diverse history, peoples, and cultures that have occupied the US South. Topics vary by semester and may include economic and political history religion, race, literature the Civil Rights movement and women's experiences.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5375. Recent America, 1876-1933. 3 Hours.

Students examine the social, economic, cultural, diplomatic and political developments of late-nineteenth and twentieth century America. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5376. Contemporary Amer,1933-Present. 3 Hours.

Students examine United States history since 1933. Topics may include the Great Depression, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Feminist Movement, the Watergate Crisis, the Iranian Hostage Crisis, the Reagan Era, the End of the Cold War, and the Roots of 9/11. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5377. The American West. 3 Hours.

Students examine the U.S.West as a region with a strong emphasis on the nineteenth century. The course content covers the interpretive development of the field as it has progressed from a traditional focus on Anglo expansion to a more balanced view that embraces race, gender, and the workaday West. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5378. Amer Cultural & Religious His. 3 Hours.

Students explore topics in the cultural and religious history of the people of North America. The course focuses on the patterns of belief and values held by men and women, which have shaped each major period from colonial times to the present.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5380. American Historiography. 3 Hours.

Students explore the complex nature of historical practice and the development of past and current fields within the discipline. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5381. World Historiography. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an in-depth examination of the interdisciplinary methodologies of the New World History. Students investigate the writing of world history as a projection of power and dominance in the era of global imperialism and colonialism non-Eurocentric explanations for the "rise of the West" and the latest scholarly efforts to construct a non-privileging world history.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5382. Topics In the History Of Women. 3 Hours.

Students examine the experiences of women of diverse cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds, including women?s responses to social forces during critical periods in their history. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5383. United States Diplomatic Hist. 3 Hours.

Students examine the development of United States foreign policy from 1775 to the present. Topics may include diplomacy of the Revolutionary era the Early Republic Manifest Destiny the Civil War era Imperialism and Expansion the Great Crusade and after World War II and the Cold War. The emphasis is on the forces that have influenced diplomacy and on the changing interpretations of United States foreign policy. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5384. Texas History. 3 Hours.

Students examine major themes in Texas history. Topics may include indigenous peoples, Spanish colonization, the Mexican era, Anglo- and African- American settlement, the Revolution and Republic period, statehood, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the cattle kingdom, the oil industry, and political and economic modernization. The course may be conducted as either a research or reading seminar. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5385. Latin American History. 3 Hours.

Students explore the history of Latin America. The topics for this course vary from semester to semester among the diplomatic, political, social, and intellectual histories of Mexico, the Caribbean, the Anglo-Spanish borderlands, or South America. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. .
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5386. African American Civil Rights. 3 Hours.

Students examine the African-American civil rights movement in the United States and discuss the origins, evolution, and continuation of the movement. Topics may include Jim Crow segregation, lynching, the establishment of the NAACP, school desegregation, the origins and evolution of Black Power, and mass incarceration.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HIST 5388. Public History. 3 Hours.

Students examine various aspects of public history. Topics may include historic preservation, museum studies, living history interpretation, archival arrangement and description, grant writing, and news media. Student projects vary by semester.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5389. Great Brit & The Brit Empire. 3 Hours.

Students examine major themes in British history. Topics may include British religious, political, social, cultural, economic and imperial histories. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5390. China in Revolution. 3 Hours.

Students examine the patterns and contradictions of the social and political revolutions in the making of modern China. They focus on how issues related to the economy, ethnicity, gender, and cultural production shaped Chinese politics and society from the collapse of the Qing dynasty in 1911 until Mao's death in 1976. Topics include the formative years of the Chinese Communist Party, the Chinese Civil War, the consolidation of the People's Republic of China, the Great Famine, and the Cultural Revolution.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5392. The Ottoman Empire, 1300-1922. 3 Hours.

Students survey the history of the Ottoman Empire in order to provide a comprehensive outlook to the diverse political and social traditions of the Islamic world. It will explore the numerous historical threads that eventually composed the fabric of societies and states in the modern Middle East. Focusing on the political and ideological history of the Ottoman Empire, this course pays attention to empire formation in the early modern era, European imperialism, modernization, and nation-building.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5393. European Diplomatic History. 3 Hours.

Students examine selected topics in the history of European international politics from the eighteenth through the twentieth century. Alternate emphasis may be placed on Eastern and Western Europe as well as on different eras of diplomacy. Students may explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5394. Early Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

Students examine the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries and consider how the foundations for Modern Europe were established amid the dynamic, if not wrenching, transformation from a medieval way of life characterized by religious concerns, kingdoms, a predominately agrarian economy, and a rigid social order, to a modern one marked by science and secularism, sovereign states, a commercialized and industrializing capitalist economy, and a more socially diverse and mobile world. Students explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5395. Later Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

Students explore selected topics in Later Modern European History. Students examine major recent historical interpretations as well as conduct research in primary sources. .
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 5396. Cross-Cultural Interactions. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an advanced, interdisciplinary investigation of the historiography of cross-cultural encounters and exchanges. Students examine the historiography of three specific case studies: the ancient Silk Roads, the trans-Eurasian Mongol Empire, and the trans-Atlantic Columbian Exchange.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

HIST 6098. Thesis I. 1-3 Hours.

HIST 6099. Thesis II. 1-3 Hours.

HIST 6394. Seminar in History. 3 Hours.

Students develop skills in locating, extracting, evaluating, and synthesizing historical information and writing an article-length paper based on primary sources.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Nancy E Baker, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Harvard University AM, Harvard University MA, George Washington University BA, Rutgers University

Rosanne M. Barker, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara MA, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara BA, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara

Jadwiga M Biskupska, PHD, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Yale University MA, Yale University MA, Yale University BA, Cornell University

Robert T Cashion, PHD, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Texas Christian University MA, Univ of Texas-Arlington BA, Austin College

Thomas H Cox, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, University at Buffalo, Suny MA, University at Buffalo, Suny BA, Birmingham-Southern College BS, Birmingham-Southern College BS, Birmingham-Southern College

Brian F Domitrovic, PHD, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Harvard University AM, Harvard University AB, Columbia University

Maggie Jane Elmore, PHD, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Calif-Berkeley MA, Texas Tech University BA, Texas Tech University

Mevhibe Pinar Emiralioglu, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Chicago MA, Univ of Chicago MA, Bilkent University BA, Bogazici University

Charles Victor Heath, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Tulane University MA, Tulane University BA, Tulane University

Kenneth E Hendrickson, PHD, Dean of Graduate Studies, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, University of Iowa MA, Texas A&M University BA, Texas A&M University

Brian Matthew Jordan, PHD, Associate Professor and Chair of History, Department of History, PHD, Yale University MA, Yale University MPHIL, Yale University BA, Gettysburg College

Jeffrey L Littlejohn, PHD, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Arkansas-Fayetteville MA, Univ of Arkansas-Fayetteville BA, Belmont University

Sarah M Mass, PHD, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Michigan MS, Univ of Edinburgh BA, Tufts University

David C Mayes, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison MA, Univ of Richmond BA, Univ of Richmond

Willis Mathews Okech Oyugi, PHD, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Calif-Los Angeles MA, Univ of Calif-Los Angeles BA, Miami University BPHIL, Miami University

Nicholas Charles Pappas, PHD, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Stanford University AM, Stanford University AB, Stanford University

Benjamin E Park, PHD, Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Cambridge MPHIL, Univ of Cambridge MS, Univ of Edinburgh BA, Brigham Young University BA, Brigham Young University

Bernadette Pruitt, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main MA, Texas Southern University BA, Texas Southern University

Uzma Quraishi, PHD, Associate Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Rice University MA, Rice University MA, Univ of Houston-Main BA, Univ of Houston-Main BA, Univ of Houston-Main

Stephen H Rapp, PHD, Professor of History, Department of History, PHD, Univ of Michigan MA, Univ of Michigan BA, Indiana University


History (HIST)

Students examine the history of the world from the dawn of civilization in Mesopotamia, China, India, Egypt, and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages in Europe and Asia. Topics may include the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Reformation, and the rise of nation states.

HIST 2312. World History since 1500. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of the world from 1500 to the present. Topics may include European expansion overseas imperialism and colonization the Industrial Revolution the Enlightenment the French Revolution nineteenth century nationalism and democracy the colonial rebellions in Africa, Latin America, and Asia World War I World War II the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

HIST 3075. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Students may take this course for Academic Distinction Credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.

HIST 3300. The Historian's Craft. 3 Hours.

Students learn the fundamental architecture and tools of the discipline, including the analysis, interpretation, and contextualization of evidence. Students conduct research in primary and secondary sources, and apply historical writing skills.
Prerequisite: Declaration of major or minor in History.

HIST 3301. Applied Public History. 3 Hours.

Students apply the theories and best practices of public history to develop an original exhibit or event for the general public. The course promotes the collaborative study and practice of history and may be offered with Academic Community Engagement distinction.
Prerequisite: HIST 3388.

HIST 3310. Mesoamerican History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of Mesoamerica, a broad geographic area comprised of peoples, including the Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec. Students analyze how the peoples of this region accomplished their achievements in architecture, calendrics, astronomy, art, the sciences, and literature.

HIST 3311. African Civilizations to 1800. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of Africa between 16,000 BC and 1800 AD. Topics may include the historical roots of Africa?s cultural diversity evolutions in agriculture and technology trade and commerce the Indian Ocean Slave Trade and the development of social, economic, and political institutions.

HIST 3312. History of East Africa. 3 Hours.

Students examine East Africa?s rich and varied past, from the earliest times to the present. Major themes may include the cultural diversity of the region, the growth of complex societies, the slave trade, East Africa?s place in the wider setting of the Indian Ocean World, colonial conquest and African responses, the regaining of African political independence, and challenges facing modern independent states.

HIST 3317. War & Revolution in China. 3 Hours.

Students examine the profound changes that China has undergone from the early twentieth century until the present day, focusing on the themes of war and revolution. Topics to be analyzed may include the collapse of the old dynastic system, the Japanese invasion of China, the Chinese Civil War, the Cultural Revolution, and protest movements in the late twentieth century.

HIST 3318. Colonial Southeast Asia. 3 Hours.

Students examine European, U.S., and Japanese empire-building in Southeast Asia from the seventeenth century until the mid-twentieth century. Topics may include European maritime empires in the South Pacific, colonial rivalries in Southeast Asia during the nineteenth century, the U.S. Philippines, and anti-colonial movements.

HIST 3322. Black Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours.

Students examine the black civil rights struggle in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Topics include the black response to Jim Crow laws, the emergence of national civil rights organizations as well as local activism and historical events that have served as catalysts for change in civil rights legislation.

HIST 3323. History of American Slavery. 3 Hours.

Students examine slavery as an integral part of America's social, cultural, and economic development as a country and also as a catalyst to the establishment of antislavery and abolitionist movements.

HIST 3325. Era of Amer Revoltn 1763-1789. 3 Hours.

Students examine the issues of conflict between English continental colonies and British imperial policy which led to the movement for independence. Topics may include internal colonial conflicts and attempts to solve the federal problem culminating in the formation of the Constitution.

HIST 3326. The History of the West. 3 Hours.

Students examine the settlement and development of the Trans-Mississippi West and its influence upon national and international affairs.

HIST 3327. Topics in the History of Gender and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

Students examine how the understanding of gender and sexuality differs historically according to factors such as race, class, ethnicity, religion and/or sexual orientation.

HIST 3328. Mod France: From Rev To Presnt. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of France from 1789 to the present. Topics include the military, political, and diplomatic history of France in this era.

HIST 3329. Contemporary Latin America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the development of the South American Republics from their independence to the present. Topics may include social, economic, and political development.

HIST 3330. Modern China and Japan. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of modern China and Japan from the last Chinese dynasties to the present. Topics may include the resilience and weaknesses of China?s imperial system the challenges posed to China?s traditions by Western economic and cultural penetration China?s twentieth century experiments in forms of government and in direction of its cultural development and the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Japan from the beginning of the Meiji period (1868) to the present.

HIST 3332. Modern Asian History. 3 Hours.

Students examine Asian history since the fourteenth century. Topics may include the modernization of Asia and the influence of colonization, nationalism, and industrialization on present-day Asia.

HIST 3333. Religion in World History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the origins, development, and modern manifestations of the major living world religions. Topics may include the peoples, times and places of the founders of each tradition the classical literature within each tradition and the canonization of these sacred writings and the significant sects and schisms within the religions that have influenced major events in world history.

HIST 3334. Renaissance Europe. 3 Hours.

Students examine the intellectual, political, social and cultural history of Europe from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, a period that saw, starting in Italy, a rebirth of the values and culture of Classical Greco-Roman civilization. Topics may include intellectual and artistic movements and the profound implications these had for European values, worldview, politics, and art.

HIST 3335. Germany & Cen Europe Sn 1815. 3 Hours.

Students examine German and Central European history. Topics may include the principal political, economic and social trends since the Congress of Vienna.

HIST 3336. Middle East Since 1700. 3 Hours.

Students examine the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the Middle East since the seventeenth century. Topics may include the decline of traditional empires the encroachment of Europe the Eastern Question the development of nationalism among the Turks, Arabs, and Iranians Islam and modern ideologies and the Middle East in the twentieth century.

HIST 3337. The Bible & Reform in Europe. 3 Hours.

Students examine the religious, social and cultural history of Europe from the sixteenth into the seventeenth centuries, a period that saw the fracturing of a unified Christendom. Topics may include religious and theological changes and the profound implications these had for European politics, social norms, cultural values, and economic endeavors.

HIST 3338. Eco His: Ind Rev To Present. 3 Hours.

Students examine the Industrial Revolution in nineteenth-century Britain and twentieth-century United States. Topics may include the relationship between agriculture and industry, the rise of the corporation, the development of the international monetary system, and systems of trade.

HIST 3339. French Revol & Napoleonic Wars. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of France during the French Revolution Napoleonic Era, 1789-1815. Topics may include the military and political history of the era, with a detailed examination of the battles and campaigns of the Napoleonic Wars.

HIST 3340. Mexican Americans Since 1848. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of Mexican-Americans in what is now the United States Southwest. The course begins with the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the war between the United States and Mexico and created a Mexican-American minority within the U.S. Topics may include such themes as the indigenous background of this population, the Chicana/o perception of the Southwest as a homeland, and the effect of that perception on the history of this ethnic group.

HIST 3342. History of Seapower. 3 Hours.

Students examine naval warfare and maritime trade from the mid-seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. Topics may include the emergence of modern state-based navies, their growing importance in warfare, the role of politics and administration in waging naval war, maritime cultures and societies, privatized war at sea, and major naval campaigns of the era.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

HIST 3347. Early Modern France, 1453-1789. 3 Hours.

Students examine major political, cultural, economic, social, intellectual, and artistic developments in France between 1453 and 1789. Topics may include the crisis of the Later Middle Ages, Renaissance France, the Protestant Reformation and the French Wars of Religion, the French Counter-Reformation, Absolutism, Overseas Expansion, the Enlightenment, and France on the eve of the French Revolution.

HIST 3350. Early Christianities. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural examination of central themes in the history of early Christianities beginning with the transformation of the Jesus Movement into a separate Christian religion and concluding with the divisions made permanent by the Fourth Crusade.

HIST 3351. Japan: The Age of the Samurai. 3 Hours.

Students examine medieval and early modern Japanese history. Beginning with the emergence of warrior bands, students explore how military men established regimes, managed vendettas, and mobilized resources. Topics may include warrior ideology, samurai rule, and the dissolution of the samurai caste.

HIST 3355. Urban and Suburban History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the growth and development of cities and suburbs in the U.S., paying particular attention to public policy, race, class, ethnic enclaves, and connections between American and global cities. Topics may include major metropolitan areas, such as Houston, Texas. Students conduct research into the city and its surrounding suburbs and locales. Credit 3 .

HIST 3357. World War I (1914-1918). 3 Hours.

Students examine World War I from its European origins to its emergence as a global conflict. Topics may include the formation of political and military alliances emerging role of the state role of industrial economies in waging war homefront cultures and societies major land campaigns of the Eastern and Western Fronts war at sea the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, which emerged out of the war and the complexity of the peacemaking process.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

HIST 3358. Silk Roads to Atlantic World. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an interdisciplinary investigation of the contexts, impulses, and implications of long-distance interplay among cultures in both pre-modern and modern times. Students apply scholarly models of cross-cultural interactions using three specific case studies: the ancient Silk Roads, the trans-Eurasian Mongol Empire, and the trans- Atlantic Columbian Exchange.

HIST 3359. Germany at War and Peace. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of militarism and warfare in Germany, from the rise of the Prussian state in the eighteenth century through the present. Topics may include the relationship between warfare and the development of German politics, society, and culture. Major historical figures include Frederick the Great, Clausewitz, Otto von Bismarck, and Adolf Hitler. How contemporary, pacifist German politics emerged out of two difficult centuries of warfare is examined.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

HIST 3361. The U. S. & the Vietnam War. 3 Hours.

Students examine the United States involvement in Southeast Asia from 1945 to 1975. Topics may include the issues of nationalism and communism in Southeast Asia the first Indochina war between the French and Vietnamese the United States military effort in Indochina from 1965 to 1975 the postwar political, economic, and social problems in the region the effect of the Vietnam War on American culture and foreign policy.

HIST 3362. The Middle East, 500 - 1700. 3 Hours.

Students examine the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the Middle East from the eve of the rise of Islam through the seventeenth century. Topics may include the Middle East before Islam the Rise of Islam the faith and practices of Islam the Rightly-Guided Caliphs Shiiah and Sunni Islam the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates the Crusades and Islam Islam and the Steppe Empires the rise and apogee of the Ottoman Empire and Islam?s initial response to the encroachment of the west.

HIST 3363. Britain to 1714. 3 Hours.

Students examine the development of the British peoples from prehistoric times to the end of the Stuart dynasty. Topics may include the peoples of Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

HIST 3364. Modern Britain 1714-Present. 3 Hours.

Students examine the effects of industrial change, the enmity of France in foreign affairs, Great Britain?s renewed expansion overseas following the American Revolution, movements favoring social and economic reform, and political trends to the present.

HIST 3365. Russian History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the roots of Russia (Kiev, Christianity, the Mongol occupation, Ivan the Terrible, the Times of Troubles) and survey Russian history from Peter the Great to the present.

HIST 3366. Modern European Military Hist. 3 Hours.

Students examine European military history and its links to political, social, and cultural changes from 1600 to the present day. Topics may include major wars in Europe, European military conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa, and the wars of decolonization.

HIST 3367. Eur-Age Absoltsm/Rev:1648-1815. 3 Hours.

Students examine significant issues in European history from 1648 to 1815. Topics may include developments in political theory, natural science and economics as well as the tensions in the old social order, which helped instigate the French Revolution.

HIST 3368. European History 1815 1914. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of the principal European powers from the Congress of Vienna to World War I.

HIST 3369. The World In The 20Th Century. 3 Hours.

Students examine global politics and diplomacy since World War I.

HIST 3370. Ancient History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of the civilizations of the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome with special emphasis upon their contribution to the cultural heritage of the western world.

HIST 3371. Medieval History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious institutions and developments in Europe from the collapse of the Roman Empire in the fifth century to the Renaissance.

HIST 3372. Historiography. 3 Hours.

Students survey various historical interpretations and develop research skills.

HIST 3373. Topc in Hist of Sci & Medicine. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of science and medicine. Topics include the development of scientific knowledge across the centuries.

HIST 3374. US Religious History to 1865. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of US religious ideas, practices, and traditions between European first contact and the Civil War. Content may include indigenous religions, colonialism, Puritanism, dissent, the constitutional laws on religious liberty, new religious movements, Catholicism, and the Civil War. Special attention will be given to diverse and competing religious expressions.

HIST 3375. US Religious History from 1865. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of US religious ideas, practices, and traditions between the end of the Civil War and the present. Content may include the growth of secularism, immigration, modernism and fundamentalism, the religious right, and religion during the world wars and civil rights movement. Special attention will be given to diverse and competing religious expressions.

HIST 3376. Early America to 1783. 3 Hours.

Students examine early American history from the beginnings of European colonization through the American Revolution and the War for American Independence.

HIST 3377. America in Midpassge 1783-1877. 3 Hours.

Students examine United States history from 1783 to 1877. Topics may include the origins of the U.S. Constitution, the early republic and rise of the two party-system, the nature of Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, the sectional crisis and the Civil War, and the era of Reconstruction.

HIST 3378. Emergence Mod Amerca 1877-1945. 3 Hours.

Students examine United States history from 1877 to 1945. Topics may include discussions of the Industrial Revolution, the Populist and Progressive movements, World War I, the era of the 1920s, the Great Depression and New Deal, and World War II.

HIST 3379. Recent America, 1945 to Presnt. 3 Hours.

Students examine United States history from the end of World War II to the present. Topics may include discussions of the Cold War the civil rights and environmental movements the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the war on global terrorism the public policy debates surrounding the role of the federal government in the modern economy and the evolution of American popular culture.

HIST 3380. The American Civil War. 3 Hours.

Students examine the sectional conflicts of the 1850s, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Topics may include the military, political, social, and diplomatic history of the era.

HIST 3381. British Empire & Commonwealth. 3 Hours.

Students examine the British Empire and Commonwealth to the present time. Topics may include the rise of colonial and dominion nationalism, the imperial conferences, and the unfolding of the British Commonwealth of Nations.

HIST 3382. Immigration Ethnicity Amer His. 3 Hours.

Students examine ethnic group relations, nativism, and racism in the historical development of American civilization, with special emphasis on the patterns of assimilation and non-assimilation of particular ethnic groups.

HIST 3383. American Women's History. 3 Hours.

Students examine U.S. women?s history. Topics may include work, marriage, family, sexuality, reproduction, education, and the social forces that have aided or blocked change in women?s roles in American society. Particular attention is paid to differences in race, class, and ethnicity.

HIST 3384. Fam & Childhd in Atlantic Wrld. 3 Hours.

Students explore how encounters among Indians, Africans, and Europeans during the early modern period transformed the structure, relationships, and experiences of families and children. Special emphasis is given to primary historical research and the effect of cross-cultural developments on shaping notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the Atlantic World.

HIST 3385. American Diplomatic History. 3 Hours.

Students examine selected topics in U.S. Diplomatic History.

HIST 3386. Military & War In America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the U.S. military experience, from the colonial period to the present. Topics may include the military, political and diplomatic history of the great conflicts of the United States.

HIST 3387. World War II. 3 Hours.

Students examine the inter-war and World War II era from 1919 - 1945, emphasizing the events leading to the war in Europe, the rise of Nazi Germany, the major battles and campaigns in the European theatre, and the aftermath of the war. Topics may include the rise of the Japanese Empire, the events leading to the outbreak of war in Asia and the Pacific, and the major battles and campaigns of the Pacific war through the defeat of Japan.

HIST 3388. Public History. 3 Hours.

Students examine topics in the field of Public History, including architectural preservation and restoration, museum studies, and oral history. Topics vary from semester to semester, but each semester students analyze oral sources, primary textual materials, and historical artifacts of various types, including architectural dwellings, tools, and local and family records.

HIST 3389. Africa - Past & Present. 3 Hours.

Students examine the problems, potentials, and upheavals of Modern Africa. Topics may include the effect of the slave trade on African society, racial conflicts, apartheid, the emergence of African nationalism, the end of white colonial rule, and the difficulties of achieving economic and political stability in contemporary Africa.

HIST 3390. Conceptualizing History Edu. 3 Hours.

Students examine conceptualization techniques in Texas, U.S., and World History. The course is designed to enable History students to organize a vast amount of material into a logical framework that will help them to better understand the interactions of individuals, communities, nations, and cultures across time and place. Special emphasis will be placed on subject areas included in the Texas Examination for Educator Standards.

HIST 3391. Colonial Latin America. 3 Hours.

Students examine the conquest and development of the colonial institutions of Spain and Portugal in the Americas, including the Spanish borderlands as the center of Spanish colonial activity and power in the Americas.

HIST 3392. Native American History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the history of Native Americans in the United States.

HIST 3393. African-American History. 3 Hours.

Students examine the African American experience in the United States. Topics may include the various forces shaping race relations in the United States.

HIST 3394. America in the 1960s. 3 Hours.

Students examine the decade of the 1960s in the United States, paying particular attention to the social, cultural, and political shifts that occurred during these years. Students develop a nuanced understanding of this pivotal decade in United States history and engage in contemporary debates about its multiple meanings.

HIST 3395. American Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Students examine how nature has affected the course of United States history, particularly in regards to the role of natural resources, the growth of the economy, responses to environmental crises and challenges, and transformations in the environment resulting from centuries of use.

HIST 3396. The American South. 3 Hours.

Students examine the dynamics and expansive nature of the U.S. South. Topics include the peoples and varied regions of the South its economic and political development literature, race and religion.

HIST 3397. Modern Mexico. 3 Hours.

Students examine the national history of Mexico from the era of independence (c.1810) to the present. Students explore the challenges that the Mexican people faced after gaining independence, their resilience during years of political and economic change, and the rich culture that has emerged in the wake of those struggles. Attention is also given to the US-Mexican border as a site of complex cultural interaction.

HIST 3398. Texas & the Southwest. 3 Hours.

Students examine the Greater Southwest, Spanish expansion and the Spanish-French rivalry in the lower Mississippi region and Texas. Topics include geographic factors and cultural developments.

HIST 3399. Special Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Students examine various specialized topics in history not normally covered in detail by other upper-level courses.

HIST 4399. History Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students examine specific topics and conduct historical research, producing an extensive research paper using primary and secondary sources.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in history or departmental approval.


Benjamin E. Park

Benjamin E. Park
Assistant Professor of History
Sam Houston State University

Benjamin Park received degrees from Brigham Young University (BA, English and history), the University of Edinburgh (MSc, Theology in History), and the University of Cambridge (MPhil, Political Thought and Intellectual History PhD, History). He spent two years as the inaugural postdoctoral fellow at the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, and is currently an assistant professor of American history at Sam Houston State University.

Dr. Park’s new book is Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier, which appeared with W. W. Norton/Liveright in February 2020 and won the Mormon History Association’s best book prize. He also recently edited A Companion to American Religious History, a textbook published by Wiley-Blackwell in January 2021.

The Kingdom of Nauvoo tells the story of Nauvoo’s rise and fall between 1839 and 1846. It draws from a broad collection of primary sources, most of them overlooked and some of them used for the first time, to narrate a moment of political and cultural crisis on the frontier. In doing so, this book offers a case study of the perils of democracy in antebellum America. How should a nation govern those religions that fall outside the boundaries of acceptability? What happens when a religious group transgresses the line between church and state? How can marginal groups react when the voice of the many infringes upon the rights of the few? These were important questions for a nation still exploring the potential and pitfalls of democratic rule. The New Yorker called the book “compelling history,” and the Wall Street Journal said it was “one of the grand, underappreciated sagas in American history,” written by “a smooth writer and a careful historian.” You can read more about the book, which will be released in paperback in August, here.

Dr. Park is currently at work on two book projects. The first, tentatively titled “An American Original: Mormonism and the Saga of Religion in the United States,” is a general survey of the LDS tradition as an expression of America’s central religious tensions. It is under contract with W.W. Norton/Liveright. The second project is an examination of how religious ideas instigated political action during the slavery and antislavery debates during the 1840s and 1850s. It is tentatively titled “A Higher Law: The Religious Underpinnings of Abolitionism,” and is under contract with Princeton University Press.

Other research has focused on the intersection between religion, culture, and democratic thought between the American Revolution and the Civil War, often within an Atlantic context. His scholarship has appeared in numerous journals, including Church History, Journal of the Early Republic, Early American Studies, Journal of American Studies, American Nineteenth-Century History, Journal of Religion and Society, Journal of Mormon History, and Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, as well as a half-dozen edited collections.

For his first book, American Nationalisms: Imagining Union in an Age of Revolutions, published by Cambridge University Press in January 2018, Dr. Park examined how local contexts influenced ideas of nation and union during the fifty years following independence. How did citizens in a new nation conceive of political union and disunion in an age in which notions of the “nation” itself were undergoing transformation? Americans scrambled to project an image of a united nation, often drawing from intellectual currents that crossed the Atlantic world, yet those very projections served to introduce new political divisions. American Nationalisms traces the contours of this significant story, and demonstrates how debates over America’s cultural boundaries have been central to the country’s nationalist project since the beginning. It was a finalist for the Sally and Morris Lasky Prize in Political History, issued by the Lebanon Valley College Center for Political History.

Dr. Park has become a national voice for issues concerning American religion and politics. He has written op-eds and essays for Washington Post, Newsweek, Houston Chronicle, Religion & Politics, Talking Points Memo, Religion Dispatches, Dallas Morning News, Salt Lake Tribune, Religion News Service, and Patheos. (You can find links on the online writing page.) His interviews have appeared in popular podcasts like 99% Invisible, Brave Little State, Mormon Land, and Meaning of Life, as well as radio programs like NPR, RadioWest, Australia Broadcast Corporation’s NightLife, and BYU Radio’s Top of Mind. He also maintains a personal blog where he highlights recent scholarship, discusses pedagogy, and otherwise reflects on history, religion, and politics.

An active participant in the fields of early American political and religious history, Dr. Park has been involved with a number of activities and associations. He currently serves as a co-editor, with Quincy Newell, of the Mormon Studies Review, an interdisciplinary academic review journal that reviews scholarly books on Mormonism for a broad academic audience. He is the founder and editor of The Junto: A Group Blog on Early American History, a premier digital space for the field, and is also one of the founding editors of Juvenile Instructor: A Group Blog on Mormon History. He has served on editorial boards for Journal of Mormon History and Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, and was a co-chair of the Mormon History Association‘s annual conference in 2016. He now serves as a member of the Mormon History Association’s executive committee, the Board of Directors for Dialogue, as well as on program committees for the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic and the Society for U.S. Intellectual History.


Contents

Sam Houston has fielded a football team since 1912 and have played continuously since 1946 following World War II. The only times the Bearkats did not field a football team were in 1918 for World War I and from 1943 to 1945 for World War II. The Bearkats competed independently from 1912 through 1923, in the Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (TIAA) from 1924 to 1931, in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) from 1932 to 1981, in NCAA Division II from 1982 to 1985 and in NCAA Division I-AA (now FCS) since the 1986 season. As well as their First FCS National Championship from the 2020 college football season against South Dakota State University.

The Bearkats have 12 conference championships, and have seen postseason NCAA playoff action in eight seasons, with back-to-back NCAA Division I Championship game appearances in 2011–2012. [4] Sam Houston State also has 3 bowl victories in four games, and one claimed National Championship from NAIA in the 1964 season. [5]

Ron Randleman is Sam Houston's and the Southland Conference's all-time winningest coach with 132 wins over a span of 23 years. Randleman also won conference Coach of the Year honors on four occasions, in the Gulf Star Conference in 1985 and 1986, and in the Southland Conference in 1991, and 2001. [6]

Paul Pierce coached the Bearkats to its only National Championship, and also won the 1965 Knute Rockne Little All-American Coach of the Year award. [7]

Willie Fritz coached Sam Houston to back-to-back conference championships and back-to-back national title game appearances in only three years, while being awarded the 2011 AFCA National Coach of the Year award and the 2012 Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year award. He was also named the 2012 AFCA Regional Coach of the Year. [8] [9] [10] [11]

On January 23, 2014, former Delaware head coach K. C. Keeler was named the 15th head coach in Sam Houston program history. [2]

Name From To Record Postseason
W L T
S. R. Warner 1912 1913 5 3 1
Gene Berry 1914 1919 14 15 1
Mutt Gee 1920 1922 6 7 4
J. W. Jones 1923 1935 54 53 9 1930 Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association champions
Henry O. Crawford 1936 1937 7 12 0
Puny Wilson 1937 1951 50 49 6
Paul Pierce 1952 1967 94 52 7 1955 Lone Star Conference co-champions, 1956 LSC champions, 1964 LSC, NAIA National co-champions, 3 bowl wins in 4 appearances
Tom Page 1968 1971 20 19 3
Allen Boren 1972 1973 7 14 0
Billy Tidwell 1974 1977 11 30 1
Melvin Brown 1978 1981 12 29 0
Ron Randleman 1982 2004 131 125 3 1985 Gulf Star Conference co-champions, 1986 GSC champions, 2001 Southland Conference co-champions, 2004 SLC co-champions
Todd Whitten 2005 2009 25 28 0
Willie Fritz 2010 2014 40 15 0 2011 SLC champions, 2011 NCAA Division I Finalist, 2012 SLC co-champions 2012 NCAA Division I Finalist
K. C. Keeler 2014 present 65 22 0 2014 SLC co-champions, 2014 NCAA Division I Semifinalist, 2015 NCAA Division I Semifinalist, 2016 SLC champions, 2016 NCAA Division I Quarterfinalist, 2017 NCAA Division I Semifinalist, 2020 SLC champions, 2020 NCAA Division I National Champions
Composite record 1912 present 525 461 34

National championships Edit

Sam Houston has two national championships, with one during their tenure in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and the other coming in FCS. In their NAIA championship game, they played Concordia Cobbers for the championship, with the game resulting in a tie, [12] becoming co-champions with Moorhead. [13] In their third FCS championship game, they defeated South Dakota State to win their first FCS national championship.

Season Coach Selector Record Result Opponent
1964 Paul Pierce National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 9–1–1 T 7–7 Concordia College
2020 K.C. Keeler NCAA Division 1 Football Championship Subdivision 10–0 W 23–21 South Dakota State

Conference championships Edit

Sam Houston has won 14 conference titles, seven shared and seven outright.

Year Conference Overall Record Conference Record
1930 Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association 9–1 5–0
1955† Lone Star Conference 6–1–2 5–1–1
1956 Lone Star Conference 10–0 7–0
1961 Lone Star Conference 8–1 7–0
1964†* Lone Star Conference 9–1–1 5–1
1985† Gulf Star Conference 8–3 4–1
1986 Gulf Star Conference 9–3 4–1
2001† Southland Conference 10–3 5–1
2004† Southland Conference 8–3 4–1
2011 Southland Conference 14–1 7–0
2012† Southland Conference 11–4 6–1
2014† Southland Conference 11–5 7–1
2016 Southland Conference 12–1 9–0
2020 Southland Conference 10–0 6–0

Conference affiliations

  • 1912–1923: Independent
  • 1924–1930: Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • 1931–1983: Lone Star Conference (NAIA)
  • 1984–1986: Gulf Star Conference (Division I FCS)
  • 1987–2020: Southland Conference (Division I FCS)
  • 2021–future: Western Athletic Conference (Division I FCS)

Bowl game appearances Edit

Sam Houston appeared in five bowl games during their time in the NAIA, going 3–0–1 in these bowl games, with the final one notably being for the NAIA championship.

Season Bowl Opponent Result
1952 Shrimp Bowl Northeastern State (OK) W 41–20
1953 Refrigerator Bowl College of Idaho W 14–12
1956 Refrigerator Bowl Middle Tennessee State W 27–13
1958 Christmas Festival Bowl Northwestern State L 11–18
1964 Championship Bowl Concordia College T 7–7

The Bearkats have appeared in the I-AA/FCS playoffs 12 times with an overall record of 19–11.

Year Round Opponent Result
1986 First Round Arkansas State L 7–48
1991 First Round Middle Tennessee State L 19–20 OT
2001 First Round
Quarterfinals
Northern Arizona
Montana
W 34–31
L 24–49
2004 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
WKU
Eastern Washington
Montana
W 54–21
W 35–34
L 13–34
2011 Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship Game
Stony Brook
Montana State
Montana
North Dakota State
W 34–27
W 49–13
W 31–28
L 6–17
2012 Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship Game
Cal Poly
Montana State
Eastern Washington
North Dakota State
W 18–16
W 34–16
W 45–42
L 13–39
2013 First Round
Second Round
Southern Utah
Southeastern Louisiana
W 51–20
L 29–30
2014 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Southeastern Louisiana
Jacksonville State
Villanova
North Dakota State
W 21–17
W 37–26
W 34–31
L 3–35
2015 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Southern Utah
McNeese State
Colgate
Jacksonville State
W 42–39
W 34–29
W 48–21
L 10–62
2016 Second Round
Quarterfinals
Chattanooga
James Madison
W 41–36
L 7–65
2017 Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
South Dakota
Kennesaw State
North Dakota State
W 54-42
W 34-27
L 13–55
2020 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship Game
Monmouth
North Dakota State
James Madison
South Dakota State
W 21-15
W 24-20
W 38-35
W 23-21

Pritchett Field (1912–1985) Edit

The Bearkats' home for football was on Pritchett Field for 73 years (1912–1985) beginning with their first football game against Rice University in 1912. The field was named after Joseph Pritchett, brother of the university's fourth president Henry Carr Pritchett, and former owner of the land the field rests on.

The final football game played on Pritchett Field was a victory for the Bearkats with a score of 51–7, defeating Washburn University. Sam Houston Football began playing games at Bowers Stadium following the 1985 season. The complex is currently home to Sam Houston Women's Soccer and Club Lacrosse. [15]

On April 18, 2013, [16] football was played on Pritchett Field for the first time since 1985 for the annual Orange-White spring game. The event also included the presentation of the Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award to head coach Willie Fritz. [10]

Bowers Stadium (1986–present) Edit

Bowers Stadium, formerly Bearkat Stadium (1986–1989), is currently home to both Sam Houston Football and the Track and Field programs beginning with the 1986 season. Bowers Stadium has a capacity of 14,000. However, 16,148 fans packed Bowers Stadium in 1994 to watch Alcorn State led by NFL bound quarterback Steve McNair in a 48-23 SAM HOUSTON victory on regional ABC-TV. [17] [18]

Stephen F. Austin Edit

The Sam Houston/Stephen F. Austin rivalry game, also known as the Battle of the Piney Woods, is a yearly rivalry held at NRG Stadium in Houston. The two teams have met 91 times with Sam Houston leading the series 57-35-2. The Battle of the Piney Woods is Texas' second longest FCS rivalry. The most recent meeting ending with the Bearkats defeating the Lumberjacks 31-20 and clinching their 9th win in a row

Bearkats in the National Football League Edit

Sam Houston has had 36 alumni play in the National Football League, with 19 players selected in the Draft. [19] [20] During the 2018 NFL Draft, the Oakland Raiders selected defensive lineman P. J. Hall in the second round. This represents the highest a Bearkat player has been drafted by an NFL team.

  • Scorpio Babers (2008–2009), CB, Miami Dolphins, Green Bay Packers (1992–2000), DL, Arizona Cardinals, Cincinnati Bengals (1979–1983), LB, New York Jets (2009–2012), QB, New York Giants, Minnesota Vikings, Oakland Raiders (2002–2008), DB, Dallas Cowboys (1998–2000), DB, Washington Redskins, San Diego Chargers (1978–1981), WR, Houston Oilers, Kansas City Chiefs, Pittsburgh Steelers (2013), WR, Carolina Panthers (2001), TE, Denver Broncos (2016–Present), P, New York Jets (2018–Present), DT, Oakland Raiders (1988–1995), DB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Cleveland Browns, Arizona Cardinals, Houston Oilers (2002–2004, 2007), TE, Carolina Panthers, Cleveland Browns, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1955–1966), DB, Chicago/St. Louis Cardinals, Detroit Lions, Kansas City Chiefs (1928), OL, Chicago Bears (1987), CB, Washington Redskins (2002–present), QB, Arizona Cardinals, Detroit Lions, Oakland Raiders, Miami Dolphins, Carolina Panthers, San Francisco 49ers, Chicago Bears, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Cleveland Browns, New York Jets, Philadelphia Eagles, Houston Texans (1978–1987), DB QB P WR, Houston Oilers, New Orleans Saints, Philadelphia Eagles (1980–1984), DB, Washington Redskins (1945–1949), FB HB QB, Cleveland/LA Rams, Washington Redskins, Baltimore Colts (1956–1961), DB, Chicago Cardinals, San Francisco 49ers, Houston Oilers (2007–2008), RB, Jacksonville Jaguars, Houston Texans (1970–1972), DT, Baltimore Colts, Cleveland Browns

National awards Edit

Sam Houston has had a total of 88 players selected into the College Football All-America Team, including 58 NCAA All-Americans and 30 NAIA All-Americans. A number of these players have also been considered for major national awards. [21] In 2016, quarterback Jeremiah Briscoe became the first Bearkat to win the Payton Award. In 2017 he became the first Bearkat to win two Payton Awards and only the second FCS player to win multiple Payton Awards after former Appalachian State quarterback Armanti Edwards became the first in 2009.

Conference awards Edit

Sam Houston has had 407 All-Conference selections and honorable mentions, including 202 in the Southland Conference, 25 in the Gulf Star Conference, 173 in the Lone Star Conference, and 7 in the Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association. [22]


A Brief History of Sam Houston State University (SHSU)

Texas is known for many things — San Antonio River Walk, Cadillac Ranch, Kemah Boardwalk, Enchanted Rock, Schlitterbahn, The Alamo, Magnolia Market at the Silos, Space Center Houston, and much more. Throughout this great state, another noteworthy claim to fame includes universities with a rich background of academic excellence, especially when it comes to the history of Sam Houston State University located in the city of Huntsville.

The foundation of SHSU can be traced back to 1879 when a group of Huntsville citizens purchased Austin Hall — a Methodist school for boys — and converted it to the first teacher-training school in the southwestern United States. On April 21, 1879, Gov. Oran Roberts officially established Sam Houston Normal Institute, and by October 10, classes began. By the end of the first academic year, 109 students were enrolled.

A series of name changes occurred over the next century before the name Sam Houston State University was officially settled in 1969 — Sam Houston State Teachers College in 1923 and Sam Houston State College in 1965.

So who is the namesake of the university? Sam Houston is considered to be a military/political Texas hero who was in attendance when Austin Hall was dedicated in 1851, and also lived down the hill from the building: “His interest and involvement in the early history of Austin Hall are evidence that he was concerned with more than matters of war and state, but also of education.” Houston served as the first and third president of the Republic of Texas, was a U.S. representative and senator, and served as the seventh governor of Texas.

Fast forward to the present day, and impressive numbers reflect how SHSU has grown to become an outstanding educational beacon for students around the world:

  • More than 20,000 students are enrolled at the university.
  • SHSU consists of 368 acres.
  • The student-to-faculty ratio averages 24:1.
  • Students have the option to choose from nearly 200 degree programs with a plethora of options for undergraduate and graduate study, online degrees, and specialists and professional programs.
  • More than 70 countries are represented by international student enrollment.
  • Alumni encompass more than 130,000 people worldwide.

And here’s a fun fact about SHSU: The College of Criminal Justice opened in 1965 and has since become one of the most prestigious programs in the nation offering degrees in criminal justice and criminology, forensic science, and security studies.

SHSU also has a stand-out list of notable names who have called the Huntsville campus home, including athletes, singers, celebrities, etc. — Dan Rather, Katie Rose Clarke, Michael Bankston, Richard Linklater, Allen Shamblin, and Roger Creager, just to name a few.


Internships and Study Abroad

History majors interested in museum careers have the opportunity of completing a museum internship as part of their undergraduate curriculum. In recent years interns have served at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum, the Star of the Republic Museum at Washington-on-the-Brazos, the Contemporary Art Museum of Houston, the Texas Prison Museum, and the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York among others.

SHSU History faculty have offered classes in England, China, Russia and Greece. The department also sponsors field classes all over the western United States. Check with the department for availability.


  • Foster a lifelong learning environment in support of a diverse faculty and staff who are excellent scholars, educators, and professionals.
  • Promote a stimulating learning environment through the integration of academic settings, campus culture and service.
  • Increase and develop university resources and infrastructures that support the intellectual transformation of students.
  • Enhance marketing outreach and visibility to include academic and scholarly activities through consistent and integrated messaging while optimizing communication channels.
  • Promote efficient data driven decision making through the integration of centralized data analysis, review, and dissemination.
  • Cultivate a continually sensitive and proactive response to the ever-changing needs of our constituents.

Sam Houston State University, located in Huntsville, Texas, is a member of The Texas State University System. The school was created by the Texas Legislature in 1879 as Sam Houston Normal Institute to educate teachers for the public schools of Texas. The baccalaureate degree was first awarded in 1919.

In 1923, the institution&rsquos name was changed to Sam Houston State Teachers College. Two years later, the college was admitted to membership in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) as an accredited institution of higher learning. A graduate degree was authorized in 1936, and the curriculum was expanded to emphasize preparation in a variety of fields.

Following World War II, an increase in students and faculty as well as a wide range of faculty-research activities provided impetus for the continued emergence of a multi-purpose institution. In recognition of these developments, the institution&rsquos name was changed by the Texas Legislature to Sam Houston State College in 1965. The number of graduate degrees conferred increased significantly in the late 1960s and the Texas Legislature, recognizing the changes that had taken place, changed the name of the institution to Sam Houston State University in 1969.

In the 1970s, the University was granted permission to offer its first doctorate, a Ph.D. in criminal justice. This program grew to be one of the largest and most recognized doctoral programs in the country. In the 1980s and 1990s, the University completed a number of academic, athletic, and support facilities. With the improvement of faculty and facilities, the University set a vision to become one of the best regional universities in the country.

During the last five years of the twentieth century, the University expanded its reach by offering programs online, at The Woodlands in a multi-institutional teaching center, and various other off-campus sites. Beginning in 2000, the University expanded its building program and committed resources to develop and maintain nationally-recognized academic support programs. Sam Houston State University increased the number of doctoral programs, including programs in education and psychology, and experienced a tremendous surge in enrollment and name recognition.

Currently Sam Houston State University is organized academically into seven colleges: Sciences, Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Education, Health Sciences, Fine Arts and Mass Communication, and Humanities and Social Sciences. Students are offered an extensive range of bachelor&rsquos and master&rsquos degrees, as well as doctorates in selected areas. The faculty and the University are recognized regionally, nationally, and internationally.


The town of Hunstville is located 70 miles from Houston. It has a population of approximately 34,500 and is surrounded with by forests, lakes and ranchlands, including Huntsville State Park, a haven for hikers and mountain bikers. Huntsville is also host of an annual folk festival and the “Fair on the Square” downtown.

  • Molly Hazlett, 2007 Miss Texas
  • Frank Bielec, notable Trading Spaces designer
  • Johnny Maze, eminent radio disc jockey
  • Steve Sparks, professional baseball player

Before losing in this year's quarterfinals to Sam Houston, North Dakota State had won the past three national championships, and eight of the last nine titles — an FCS record. Georgia Southern (now an FBS member) is next with six FCS titles. See the full year-by-year championship history below.

YEAR CHAMPION COACH SCORE RUNNER-UP SITE
2019 North Dakota State Matt Entz 28-20 James Madison Frisco, Texas
2018 North Dakota State Chris Klieman 38-24 Eastern Washington Frisco, Texas
2017 North Dakota State Chris Klieman 17-13 James Madison Frisco, Texas
2016 James Madison Mike Houston 28-14 Youngstown State Frisco, Texas
2015 North Dakota State Chris Klieman 37-10 Jacksonville State Frisco, Texas
2014 North Dakota State Chris Klieman 29-27 Illinois State Frisco, Texas
2013 North Dakota State Craig Bohl 35-7 Towson Frisco, Texas
2012 North Dakota State Craig Bohl 39-13 Sam Houston State Frisco, Texas
2011 North Dakota State Craig Bohl 17-6 Sam Houston State Frisco, Texas
2010 Eastern Washington Beau Baldwin 20-19 Delaware Frisco, Texas
2009 Villanova Andy Talley 23-21 Montana Chattanooga, Tenn.
2008 Richmond Mike London 24-7 Montana Chattanooga, Tenn.
2007 Appalachian State Jerry Moore 49-21 Delaware Chattanooga, Tenn.
2006 Appalachian State Jerry Moore 28-17 Massachusetts Chattanooga, Tenn.
2005 Appalachian State Jerry Moore 21-16 UNI Chattanooga, Tenn.
2004 James Madison Mickey Matthews 31-21 Montana Chattanooga, Tenn.
2003 Delaware K.C. Keeler 40-0 Colgate Chattanooga, Tenn.
2002 Western Kentucky Jack Harbaugh 34-14 McNeese State Chattanooga, Tenn.
2001 Montana Joe Glenn 13-6 Furman Chattanooga, Tenn.
2000 Georgia Southern Paul Johnson 27-25 Montana Chattanooga, Tenn.
1999 Georgia Southern Paul Johnson 59-24 Youngstown State Chattanooga, Tenn.
1998 Massachusetts Mark Whipple 55-43 Georgia Southern Chattanooga, Tenn.
1997 Youngstown State Jim Tressel 10-9 McNeese State Chattanooga, Tenn.
1996 Marshall Bob Pruett 49-29 Montana Huntington, W.Va.
1995 Montana Don Read 22-20 Marshall Huntington, W.Va.
1994 Youngstown State Jim Tressel 28-14 Boise State Huntington, W.Va.
1993 Youngstown State Jim Tressel 17-5 Marshall Huntington, W.Va.
1992 Marshall Jim Donnan 31-28 Youngstown State Huntington, W.Va.
1991 Youngstown State Jim Tressel 25-17 Marshall Statesboro, Ga.
1990 Georgia Southern Tim Stowers 36-13 Nevada Statesboro, Ga.
1989 Georgia Southern Erk Russell 37-34 Stephen F. Austin * Statesboro, Ga.
1988 Furman Jimmy Satterfield 17-12 Georgia Southern Pocatello, Idaho
1987 Louisiana-Monroe Pat Collins 43-42 Marshall Pocatello, Idaho
1986 Georgia Southern Erk Russell 48-21 Arkansas State Tacoma, Wash.
1985 Georgia Southern Erk Russell 44-42 Furman Tacoma, Wash.
1984 Montana State Dave Arnold 19-6 Louisiana Tech Charleston, S.C.
1983 Southern Illinois Rey Dempsey 43-7 Western Carolina Charleston, S.C.
1982 Eastern Kentucky Roy Kidd 17-14 Delaware Wichita Falls, Texas
1981 Idaho State Dave Kragthorpe 34-23 Eastern Kentucky Wichita Falls, Texas
1980 Boise State Jim Criner 31-29 Eastern Kentucky Sacramento, Calif.
1979 Eastern Kentucky Roy Kidd 30-7 Lehigh Orlando, Fla.
1978 Florida A&M Ruby Hubbard 35-28 Massachusetts Wichita Falls, Texas

* -- Stephen F. Austin's participation in 1989 championship vacated.

Anthony Chiusano is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts and has been with Turner Sports since 2016. He has covered numerous NCAA championship events, including the FCS Championship and College World Series.

The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NCAA or its member institutions.


Watch the video: A Tour At Sam Houston State University. Huntsville, Texas USA (August 2022).